Incorporating the Andaman Sea, Gulf of Thailand, Malaysia, Indonesia… and more

Southeast Asia Pilot by Bill O’Leary & Andy Dowden

Malaysia East Malaysia (Borneo) Tunka Abdul Rahman Marine Park

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TUNKA ABDUL RAHMAN MARINE PARK

This coastline and scattered islands is best cruised during the Northeast monsoon which blows November through May. If cruising during the Southwest monsoon more caution is required when leaving vessels unattended.

The reef between Pulau Gaya and Sutera Harbour’s northern point protects the thriving city of Kota Kinabalu, usually known as ‘KK’. The older charted channel in the extreme south of the reef still gives access to the city, but a newer uncharted (albeit well marked) channel has been cut directly through the centre of the reef giving good access to the waterfront. Local knowledge should be sought before venturing unaided into this busy area.

The first of the beaches and islands of the Tunka Abdul Rahman Marine Park lie conveniently two and half nautical miles west-north-west of Sutera Harbour.

This marine park offers great anchorages and clean beaches with good snorkelling on the islands’ fringing reefs. The area gets busy during the middle part of the day from August to November when the tourists visit. Quieter anchorages can be found away from the tourist areas.

A PULAU SULUG 3.5 miles from Sutera Harbour

PULAU SULUG. 5° 57.558N, 115° 59.829E

This picturesque deep-water anchorage in 20 metres is suitable for snorkelling and lazing on the sandy spit located on the eastern side of the island. The spit rises sharply from 20 metres, so approach with care when anchoring. Shallower water can be found a short distance northwest. Southeast of the anchorage is a fringing reef suitable for snorkelling and diving. Pulau Sulug is quiet since it is not on the itinerary for day boats working out of Sutera Harbour.

B PULAUMANUKAN 3 miles from Sutera Harbour

PULAU MANUKAN. 5° 58.41N, 116° 00.33E

Anchor in 10-15 metres on the southeastern side of this wooded island, near the series of buoys running out from shore. The bay is protected by fringing reef; other parts of the island are easily accessible by tender. Excellent snorkelling.

Peaceful beach at Tunku Abdul Rahman Marine Park - Photo by www.sabah.edu.my
Peaceful beach at Tunku Abdul Rahman Marine Park - Photo by www.sabah.edu.my

C PULAU GAYA (SOUTH WEST) 4 miles from Sutera Harbour

PULAU GAYA (SOUTH WEST). 6° 00.65N, 116° 00.57E

Approach the small bay from the southeast on a heading of 334°, taking care to avoid the fringing reef on both sides, from the easterly point of Pulau Sinjataan and Southern Pulau Gaya. The channel shallows up to 9 metres from 22 and then drops down again into a basin of 16 metres.

Alternative anchorage is in the small bay four cables to the east in 12 metres. This is a great spot for snorkelling.

D PULAU GAYA NORTH, POLICE BAY 8 miles from Sutera Harbour

PULAU GAYA NORTH, POLICE BAY. 6°01.8N, 116°01.2E

Anchor in 7-12 metres in front of the beach deep inside the bay. Take care to avoid the fringing reef lining both sides of the bay and running up to the beach.

The steep jungle clad hills are spectacular and monitor lizards and wild pigs can be seen on the beach. The snorkelling is excellent and, although the anchorage is exposed to occasional strong northerlies, the holding is good.

Sutera Harbour - Photo by Mohd Shukur Jahar/Shutterstock.com
Sutera Harbour - Photo by Mohd Shukur Jahar/Shutterstock.com

E PULAU TIGA & PULAU KALAMPUNIAN 28 miles from Sutera Harbour

PULAU TIGA & PULAU KALAMPUNIAN 5° 41.871N, 115°40.064E

30 miles south towards Labuan is Pulau Tiga, where Richard Hatch won the now-famous first ‘Survivor’ reality television series. A small resort, jetty and snorkelling beaches can be found on the southeastern side. Cruising southeast is a peninsula of hazardous reef with the south point well marked by a green buoy topped with a green flashing light.

Two miles to the north is Pulau Kalampunian, a large sandy cay surrounded by reef. On the northeastern side of the cay, at our anchorage GPS position, is a small bay with good holding on sand in 10 metres. Take care to avoid the fringing reef and rocks lurking just below the surface at low tides.

The bay offers good snorkelling accessible from the sand spit beach. Further north from here is Pulau Borong, known locally as ‘Snake Island’. This is where scores of sea serpents (banded krait) migrate ashore to copulate. Signs warn of entry onto the island, but a guided tour is available from the resort on Tiga.

Kota Kinabalu & Pulau Tiga
Kota Kinabalu & Pulau Tiga

G TELUK AMBONG 32 miles from Sutera Harbour

TELUK AMBONG. 6°18.64N, 116° 18.17E

On the coast 30 miles north of Sutera Harbour, this is a great stopover heading in either direction. Beautiful beaches and verdant jungle bound the deep bay. When entering, be aware of the isolated rocks and fringing reef on the extremities and the floating fish farms closer in.

Anchor on the southern shore in front of the small stilted village in 8 metres. On clear days, it is possible to see the cloud-shrouded Mount Kinabalu towering in the east.

H PULAU MANTANANI BESAR 53 miles from Sutera Harbour

PULAU MANTANANI BESAR. 6°42.22N, 116°22.07E

Don't miss these two jewel islands. There are many anchorages to choose from depending on conditions. We recommend between the two islands on sand in 6-7 metres opposite a very small islet undercut with caves.

Another nice anchorage is the eastern tip of the main island’s southern side, 6° 42.22N, 116° 22.07E in 7-10 metres. Take care at both spots to avoid the scattered coral outcrops closer in.

The main island has a village and small school; the locals are friendly and welcoming and can assist with knowledge of the best diving and snorkelling areas. On the eastern shore of the smaller island in the channel are beautiful coral gardens where dugongs are said to dwell.

I PULAU KULAMBOK 79 miles from Sutera Harbour

PULAU KULAMBOK. 6°59.6N 116°43.4E

Located 27 miles northeast of Pulau Mantanani and four miles south off the Borneo peninsula, Pulau Kulambok is connected to the mainland by a sand spit, the island offers two small bays ideal for the day.

Although anchorage is available both sides of the isthmus, we recommend the northern bay in 5-7 metres avoiding the shallowing scattered rock to the east-southeast.

While every effort has been made to ensure that the information contained in this book is accurate, the charts of anchorages are based on personal experience and satellite imagery and are intended as a guide only. They should not be used for navigation. Please refer to Official Hydrographic Charts of the respective countries.

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