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  • MALAYSIA PROCEDURES & VISAS

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    Ships’ documents and valid passports for all crew members must be carried to gain entry into Malaysia. Most international visitors will be granted a tourist visa on entry. This is valid for 60 days and extendable by up to three months.

    Yachts entering Malaysian waters on the Malacca Straits side should proceed to the nearest port of entry.

    From Singapore north these are Puteri (pronounced Poo-tree) Harbour – 5 miles past the Tuas 2nd Link bridge in the west Johor Strait – Malacca, Port Dickson, Port Klang, Lumut, Penang and Langkawi.

    Yachts entering east side of Peninsular Malaysia through the South China Sea from Singapore can clear into Malaysia close by at two international ferry terminals with Customs, Immigration and Quarantine (CIQ) facilities.

    These are located in the East Johor Strait, seven miles from Changi Village at Tanjung Belungkor Ferry Terminal – in the mangrove channel north of Pulau Tekong – and at Pengileh Ferry Terminal Pengarang east of Pulau Tekong just south of the Malaysian Navy base.

    Opportunities to check in much further up the South China Sea coast are located at Tioman Island, Kuantan, Kuala Terengganu and Kota Bharu.

    Yachts making passage past ports on either coast are unlikely to be challenged as long as ships papers are in order and they are heading for Thailand or another local port of entry. Visiting yachts should always report to Marine Harbourmaster, Immigration, and Customs in that order.

    On leaving the port, this process needs to be repeated and a port clearance document for the vessel and crew obtained even if you are heading for another destination in Malaysia. Most officers will facilitate both on the same day if required.

    Since the new government came into power in 2018 there have been occasional ‘sticky’ new policy interpretations of old and new pleasure yacht marine transit laws. Some on-line forums have complained of recent clearing in and out procedural headaches for visiting yachts.

    For instance, in Langkawi Marine Department officers insist that an agent must facilitate all ‘Motor Boats’ over 24 metres, including some smaller sailing catamarans. Malaysian Marine Department is currently undergoing sweeping changes in personnel and procedures, including those for foreign yachts and crews.

    We’ve been assured that the changes (when fully implemented) are designed to assist free passage and support foreign yachts cruising or parked within Malaysian territories without compromising the safety and security of the nation’s sovereign waters. At the time of writing foreign yachts can still be left periodically in Malaysian marinas and the formalities involved for vessels and crew are relatively simple compared with other countries in the region.

  • PHUKET BOAT LAGOON

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    GROW your boating lifestyle with Thailand’s premier marina

    Phuket Boat Lagoon Marina

     

    The first

    As the saying goes, “Necessity is the mother of invention” and that is how the history of Thailand’s first and premier marina – Phuket Boat Lagoon – started nearly 30 years ago. Now Phuket Boat Lagoon is Phuket’s first integrated marina complex.

    This development, which today is a fully developed Lifestyle Marina Village, is the brainchild of the founder and chairman, Kanit Yongsakul. Most sailors consider the complex to be on a par with other leading marinas across the globe.

    Phuket Boat Lagoon Marina

     

    Central location

    Officially opened in 1994, the circular marina, which provides moorings for vessels up to 32 metres long, is at the end of a 2-mile creek called Klong Tha Rua, on the east coast of Phuket in southern Thailand.

    It’s located in the centre of Phuket Island, so traffic on the main highway from the airport must pass the marina entrance on the way to Phuket town or the west coast beaches. Phuket Boat Lagoon is 20km from the airport, 8km to Phuket City and 15km to Kata, Karon and Patong beaches.

    Phuket Boat Lagoon Marina

     

    Regional leader

    Planned as only marina berths at first, hardstand facilities with travel lift services were introduced later in response to increased demand and obvious need.

    “We are focused on being the region’s leader, in boating and in the hospitality industry. We aim to excel in our core businesses, which are boating and lifestyle retail, by providing the quality standard for the community that we care for”, says Boon Yongsakul, Deputy Managing Director of Phuket Boat Lagoon.

    As the marine industry in Thailand took a greater step, with Phuket becoming the region’s marine leisure hub, it became clear that there was a tremendous opportunity to further expand Phuket Boat Lagoon.

    Phuket Boat Lagoon Marina

     

    Wide range of businesses

    International yachting and marine businesses were making Phuket and Phuket Boat Lagoon their base, so there was an increasing need for this complex to cater for growth. Today, this marina village has a 270-room resort development, which caters for the yachting community, as well as business and leisure travellers.

    The marina complex itself is surrounded by shop-office lots for a wide range of businesses, including marine-related, lifestyle, commercial, financial services and an international early learning school.

    The Phuket Boat Lagoon village also comprises residential developments, ranging from condominiums and townhouses to villas and bungalows. These residential areas are available for ownership and long-term lease.

    Phuket Boat Lagoon Marina Resort

     

    Full-service international standard marina

    More recently, the marina took a greater step towards both on-water and off-water expansion. Today, the Phuket Boat Lagoon is a full-service marina of international standard in southern Thailand, with 180 berths in the water, 150 on the hardstand and 24 dry stacking bays. Other facilities include a fuel dock, four marine travel lifts with capacity from 40 tons up to 120 tons, forklift services up to 6 tons, a large concrete work area (hardstand) and a concrete boat ramp 7.8 metres wide. All berths are complete with power and water, while the marina is also equipped with a 24-hour security service, high network CCTV coverage, security controlled access to marina pontoons and firefighting services.

    Phuket Boat Lagoon Marina

     

    Complete offering

    Besides providing complimentary wireless internet, hot showers and changing room facilities (available at the resort), the marina also offers storage room rentals for short and long term needs. A well-protected and well-serviced marina, it is ideal for owners to berth here on a long term basis.

    The Boat Lagoon Resort is a resort hotel of 270 rooms and full service apartments. These apartments, with their nautical décor and ambience, are unique in Phuket. The Lagoon Quay, located on the ground floor of the marina zone, consists of a collection of dining outlets and marine oriented businesses – overlooking the beautiful marina with its moored yachts and pleasure crafts.

    Phuket Boat Lagoon Marina Resort

     

    Everything self-contained

    The marina complex today houses a wide range of businesses, services and products, where a boat owner, resident or the hotel guest may not need to travel outside the marina village. There are fully-fledged banking services, an international supermarket, an ice-skating rink, dental and skin clinics, a pharmacy, a wide range of restaurants and bars, business service offices, health centres (spa, yoga, martial arts, gymnasium), car rental services, a laundry, daily island tour operators and private yacht charters, a child early learning development school and a music school to name a few.

    Phuket Boat Lagoon Marina
    Phuket Boat Lagoon Marina

     

    Wide range of marine services

    For avid boaters, there are chandleries, electronic parts, navigational systems, fibre glass and stainless steel repairs, woodworks including teak wood and much, much more available on-site. Furthermore, Phuket Boat Lagoon has a large workshop specialising in stainless steel and welding works. Additionally, in order to enhance our service to boat owners, we are equipped with a licensed Bonded Warehouse – which is our one-stop centre for the importation of tax free marine parts.

    Our Bonded Warehouse also provides services for repairs, with a team of experienced yacht repair technicians, to carry out works on your boat.

    Phuket Boat Lagoon Marina

     

    Today, Phuket Boat Lagoon has branded itself as “Phuket’s Most Lively Marina” and to live up to our tagline, regular activities and events are organised for the residents, guests and visitors. “I am proud to be associated with a group that has such wonderful vision and takes on a great role in promoting the marine industry in Thailand. The owners are truly ‘people-orientated’ and the team at Phuket Boat Lagoon is well experienced and a pleasure to work with,” said Executive Director, Wicky Sundram.

    For more information on Phuket Boat Lagoon, kindly visit our website, our Facebook pages or email us – all details below:

    PHUKET BOAT LAGOON CO., LTD.
    22/1 Moo 2 Thepkasattri Rd., T. Kohkaew, A. Muang, Phuket, 83000, Thailand
    Tel: + 66 76 239 888 Fax: +66 76 273 371
    Email: info@phuketboatlagoon.com
    Facebook: @PhuketBoatLagoon & @BoatLagoonWeekend
    www.phuketboatlagoon.com

  • THE SPONSORSHIP EXPERTS

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    Paul Poole

    The yachting industry in Southeast Asia has seen significant growth in recent years with yacht shows, races and regattas increasing in both size, numbers and frequency. Sports tourism is becoming a buzzword and entrepreneurs, investors and governments are all buying in.

    This presents a huge opportunity for organisers to put on bigger and better events and for brands and businesses to reach out to a specific target group of high net worth individuals, build brand identity, and align their marketing initiatives with some of the region’s biggest and most prestigious events. It also means that there is a growing need for marketing consultants to help sponsors and organisers to maximise their potential.

    Below are some steps organisers and sponsors can take to make successful events and get the most out of the partnership.

    Before the event

    Planning is the key to a successful event and it is important that sponsors and organisers identify their objectives. Sponsorship is a value-adding exercise for both organisers and sponsors and it is important to approach it from that point of view. Organisers should understand the needs and objectives of brands and businesses, just as brands and businesses should understand the particular event and its participants in order to maximise the benefits of the sponsorship.

    During the event

    Activation is the key to a successful sponsorship. A rule of thumb is for every dollar spent on sponsorship, sponsors are encouraged to spend an additional dollar on the activation of the sponsorship. The world of advertising is changing and specialised events such as yacht shows, races or regattas offer a perfect opportunity for brands and businesses to engage and interact with their target customers. With event participants active on a variety of social media platforms, sponsors also have a vested interest in being highly visible throughout the event and organisers can increase their visibility by being associated with brands and businesses who already have a large following.

    After the event

    Now is the time to measure the benefit of the sponsorship, and while most sponsors are looking for a return on investment, which they can quantify in terms of actual sales and leads during the event itself, there are benefits which aren’t immediately measurable, such as long term brand attributes, increased awareness and indirect sales.

    As Southeast Asia’s yachting calendar becomes increasingly busy, and consumers and participants have more shows, races and regattas to choose from than ever before, it is crucial that organisers and sponsors work together to ensure events remain relevant, attractive and entertaining – or they risk losing out to the competition.

    About the author

    Paul Poole is the founder, managing director and chairman of Paul Poole (South East Asia) Co., Ltd., an independent marketing consultancy based in Bangkok, Thailand. The company specialises in commercial sponsorship and partnership marketing, working with both rights holders and brands. Paul Poole (South East Asia) Co., Ltd. has packaged, sold and managed sponsorship and partnership opportunities for a number of Southeast Asia’s leading yachting events. www.paulpoole.co.th

  • Hazardous Marine Life

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    A golden rule to avoid any aquatic injuries iterated by diver training agencies is’ “don’t touch, chase or provoke anything under the water or on the surface”. However, there may be the odd occasion when it’s not as quite straight forward as that – in turbid waters for instance.

    Here is a ‘handful’ of ‘pain inducing nasties’ to be particularly cautious of and what to do if you are unfortunate enough to come into contact with them!

    Hot Water Treatment (HTW)

    Tightly tie a broad ligature between the inflicted limb and the body, which must be released every 15 minutes.

    The inflicted area should then be immersed in water at a temperature of 50ºC for two hours, or until the pain stops. This will need to be followed up by antibiotic and anti-tetanus treatment.

    In the shallows

    Jellyfish stings range from skin irritations to deep lesions. Avoidance is best achieved by constantly being aware of what’s around, above and below you. Keep a constant lookout! Avoid the tentacles.

    If you do get stung, immediately flush the area using the same water that it occurred in – stung in salt water, flush with salt water, NOT fresh, and vice versa. Immediately after that flush the area with acetic acid (vinegar) and, if there are any tentacles embedded in the skin, remove with tweezers or gloved fingers. If pain worsens or breathing difficulties are experienced, seek medical attention immediately.

    Barracuda are commonly seen in large schools. However, lone specimens have been known to bite, generally in low visibility waters when a shiny item such as jewellery, knife blade or camera lens is mistaken for their prey of small fish; so best to avoid shiny objects whilst in the water! If bitten, thoroughly clean any wound and apply antiseptic or antibiotic cream.

    Indian Lionfish
    Indian Lionfish

    In midwater

    Lionfish are slow moving and generally encountered around reefs and wrecks. They have beautiful long feather like fins, but these harbour venomous spines which cause a very nasty sting. Immediately clean the wound and adhere to the Hot Water Treatment (HTW) if the skin is punctured.

    Sea snake venom is more potent than that of the cobra, but they are rarely aggressive, have very short fangs and small mouths which cannot be opened very wide; they would be capable of biting between fingers, so keep your fingers together in their presence! If bitten, immediately tie a broad ligature tightly between the infliction and the body and wash the wound. CPR may be necessary. Seek medical facilities as antivenins will be needed.

    Triggerfish are all territorially aggressive, especially if they are nesting (shallow pits in the sandy seabed). If approached too closely, males will charge at the encroacher to ward them off, plus they have a nasty couple of teeth to finish the job! If you are unfortunate to be on the receiving end, the recommended procedure is to swim backwards and place your feet between you and the attacker, and at NO TIME take your eyes off them, until you have backed away far enough to satisfy him that you are no longer a threat. If bitten, treat with antiseptic cream.

    Stinging hydroids can cling to anchor lines and if contact is made with them, they release nematocysts into the skin, which, although not a serious problem, can be very painful and, in some cases, cause blistering. To treat, flush or submerge the affected area with acetic acid (vinegar) followed by antihistamine cream to ease any pain.

    Stonefish
    Stonefish

    On the seabed

    Fire coral is more closely related to stinging hydroids rather than an actual true coral, however, as in its namesake any contact will result in some very nasty and painful blistering. The treatment is the same as for stinging hydroids.

    Cone shells should never be handled; they are capable of firing a poisonous dart form a tube-like organ. This results in numbness followed by local muscle paralysis which can lead to respiratory paralysis and heart failure. The treatment is to immediately tie a broad ligature tightly between the infliction and the body and wash the wound. CPR may be necessary.

    Sea urchins can have poisonous spines and even if not poisonous, they still easily puncture skin and break off, especially if trodden on, leaving painful wounds that can go sceptic. Apply HTW. This will help in softening up any embedded spines and allow the body to eject them. Applying papaya juice or wine will also help to reduce pain. Septic wounds will require antibiotics.

    Stingrays range in size from a few centimetres across to several metres and they have spines in the top of their tails which can lash out in any direction if trodden on or caught. The wounds can be large and in rare cases fatal. Clean the wound and remove any spines with tweezers. Follow up with HTW.

    Stonefish are the best camouflaged and most dangerous member of the scorpionfish family. The spines in their dorsal fins contain a very nasty venom, and are raised if the fish is disturbed. These cause intense pain and swelling and you should immediately clean the wound and adhere to HTW.

    Scorpionfish, although less camouflaged and not as dangerous as the stonefish, should still be avoided. Failing to do so, will require the same treatment as for stonefish.

    Onboard First Aid Kit

    This should be waterproof, sealed and preferably compartmentalised for ease of finding things when needed quickly. As a minimum, ensure it contains the following items:

    First Aid Manual | Hazardous marinelife reference and identification guides | Emergency contact numbers for en-route locations & destination | Pencil and notebook | Tweezers | Round ended safety scissors | Large sterile dressings | Fabric band-aid plaster/dressing strip | Triangular bandage | Large safety pins | Sterile cotton wool | 2” wide crepe bandages | Eye drops | Antiseptic cream | Antihistamine cream | Vinegar | Sachets of electrolytes Sterilised syringe and needles

  • Major yachting events in the region

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    The Southeast Asia region plays host to a number of regattas and other boating events. Traditional, long-running regattas such as Phuket King’s Cup, Raja Muda and China Sea Race are still going strong and are now joined by more recently established events such as The Bay Regatta, Phuket Raceweek, Koh Samui Regatta and Top of the Gulf Regatta.
    Singapore, Hong Kong, Philippines and Indonesian events are adding to a growing regional race calendar. The number and diversity give you the opportunity to take part in a local regatta whatever time of year you’re in the area.
    Below are the key events, the month in which they happen, together with where to find out more information.
    Obviously, the Covid 19 pandemic has wreaked havoc with regional events. Unless otherwise noted, the events below are as planned pre-pandemic. At this stage, we assume that they will all resume when life returns more or less to normal.

    For guidance on finding, managing and retaining event sponsors, visit:
    Paul Poole (South East Asia) Co., Ltd

    JANUARY

    Singapore Straits Regatta

    Hosted by Changi and RSYC Yacht Clubs, the first international regatta of the year is held in the straits between Singapore and the Indonesian Riau islands. Round-the-cans and coastal races hopping between marinas IRC handicap classes. Straits Regatta on Facebook

    Royal Langkawi Regatta

    Five days of coastal and round-the-cans racing with based at Langkawi Yacht Club. Free berthing for participants. Raced under IRC, OMR and local handicap system. www.langkawiregatta.com

    Thailand Yacht Show

    A second Phuket boat show launched in 2016, 13 years after the ground-breaking PIMEX. Organised by the same company as the Singapore Yacht Show, this event has taken over as Phuket’s only boat show. www.thailandyachtshow.com

    Neptune Regatta

    Sail and motor yacht rally to Neptune Island on the equator from Nongsa Point Marina on Batam, Indonesia. Mainly social with a touch of competitiveness, vessels mainly from Singapore marinas but all are welcome. www.neptune-regatta.com

    FEBRUARY

    The Bay Regatta

    Four days of racing between the islands of Phang Nga Bay and Krabi. Perfect for families and less serious racers. Held shortly after Chinese New Year, there’s a party at a different beach venue each night. Racing under IRC, OMR and local handicap classes. www.bayregatta.com

    APRIL

    Hua Hin Regatta

    Organised by the Yacht Racing Association of Thailand (YRAT) off the Gulf town of Hua Hin, an hour south of the capital Bangkok. A one-design class dinghy regatta with many of Thailand’s top sailors. www.yrat.or.th

    Singapore Yacht Show

    Held at the award-winning ONE°15 Marina Club, the Singapore Yacht Show provides a platform for regional guests to meet yachting professionals, boat owners, supercar aficionados and a group of participants keen to explore the luxury yachting scene. A lifestyle event, the show boasts glamorous parties, high-end entertaining, luxury properties and prestige lifestyle brands. www.singaporeyachtshow.com

    China Sea Race Series

    The series comprises a 550-mile race from Hong to Subic Bay or to San Fernando, alternating each year, and is followed by the 4-day President’s Cup in Manila Bay. Organised jointly by the Royal Hong Kong Yacht Club and Manila Yacht Club.www.rhkyc.org.hk   www.manilayachtclub.org

    THE LEADING SUPERYACHT EVENT IN ASIA
    By invitation only, the Kata Rocks Superyacht Rendezvous (KRSR) is designed to bring like-minded people together from a curated guest list that features yacht owners, major trend-setters, builders, industry professionals and VIP guests interested in yachting and luxury lifestyle, plus an influential mix of luxury lifestyle and yachting media.

    Kata Rocks Superyacht Rendezvous

    The event is open to both sailing and motor yachts measuring over 24 metres in length, visiting or based in Phuket – Southeast Asia’s leading luxury location and superyacht hot spot. The KRSR signals the opening of Phuket’s luxurious charter season offering superyacht owners a prime-time opportunity to showcase their flagship vessels. www.phuketsuperyachtrendezvous.com

    MAY

    Top of the Gulf Regatta

    Racing out of Ocean Marina in Pattaya, this event attracts a large fleet of Platus. Dinghy and beach cat classes are the biggest numbers, but racing is also organised for keelboats and multihulls.  www.topofthegulfregatta.com

    Samui Regatta

    Based in Chaweng, this regatta attracts around 30 keelboats and multihulls. Popular with Hong Kong and Pattaya based yachts, being on the Gulf side of the peninsula. Raced under IRC, OMR and local handicap. www.samuiregatta.com

    JUNE

    CSC@Besar Regatta

    Jointly organised by Changi Sailing Club and Aseania Beach Resort on Pulau Besar, off Malaysia’s east coast, this is the newest event on the block. After customs clearance at Changi Sailing Club, participating yachts begin a 100nm passage race for cruising and racing class yachts from CSC to Pulau Besar. Immigration and customs clearance is arranged. enquiry@csc.org.sg

    JULY

    Multihull Solutions Regatta by Phuket Yacht Club

    Based at the Phuket Yacht Club in Ao Chalong, this 3-day event attracts most of the keen multis in the region. Classes include Firefly one design, mixed performance and cruising multihulls. www.phuketyachtclub.com

    Cape Panwa Hotel Phuket Raceweek

    Based at Cape Panwa Hotel, this is the first event in the Asian Yachting Grand Prix circuit. Often breezy in the SW monsoon, it’s sailed in the waters around Chalong Bay. Raced over four days under IRC, OMR, one-design and local handicap systems, international participants join local yachts for some serious, but fun, racing.  www.phuketraceweek.com

    RSYC Regatta

    This is the Republic of Singapore Yacht Club’s signature keelboat event, held over two weekends each year. Three days of fleet racing in Singapore waters for perpetual Challenge Trophies dating back to 1926.  www.rsycregatta.org

    Sail Indonesia Rally

    From Darwin through the Indonesian archipelago to Singapore, with stopovers at Timor, Banda, Lembata, Wakatobi, Flores, Sulawesi, Bali, Java, Borneo, Belitung and Batam or Bintan just south of Singapore.  www.sailindonesia.net

    AUGUST

    Western Circuit Regatta Singapore

    Three days of sailing over two weekends in front of Singapore’s Raffles Marina. This event is co-organised by Raffles Marina and Singapore Management University (SMU) and is the premier regatta on the Singapore racing scene.  www.westerncircuit.com

    Darwin to Ambon Yacht Race & Rally

    Organised by Darwin’s Dinah Beach Cruising Yacht Association, this 600-mile event is a bit on-and-off, but check out the website; it’s touted to become one of the classic blue water events in Southeast Asia. www.darwinambonrace.com.au

    OCTOBER

    China Coast Regatta

    Organised by the Royal Hong Kong Yacht Club, this three-day event attracts all of the top Asian sailors in IRC racing. Raced off Hong Kong and China.  www.rhkyc.org

    China Cup International Regatta

    Hong Kong to Shenzhen, then three days’ racing in and around Shenzhen’s Daya Bay. www.chncup.com

    Biennial Hainan Race China Coast Regatta

    The Royal Hong Kong Yacht Club’s 360-mile course to Sanya on Hainan Island, renowned as a playground for China’s jet set.  www.chinacoastraceweek.com

    RHKYC Nha Trang Rally

    A three-day passage race finishing in Nha Trang. This is another favourite with the Hong Kong racing fraternity. (It was the Hong Kong to Vietnam Race.)   www.rhkyc.org

    NOVEMBER

    Raja Muda International Regatta

    Starts from Royal Selangor Yacht Club and finishes with inshore racing off Langkawi. Includes overnight and passage racing. Raced under IRC and local handicap systems. www.rmir.com

    Thailand Charter Week

    A business to business 6-day event exclusively for bona fide charter brokers, central agents, luxury travel agents and tour operators. An opportunity to discover some of Southeast Asia’s finest cruising grounds on board some of the region’s best charter yachts.

    The programme includes yacht inspections, a familiarisation cruise, panel discussions and destination seminars with local companies. Visiting charter brokers will be able to learn about the destination, making it the perfect experience to help them sell Thailand to their international clientele. Thailand Charter Week

    All Souls Regatta

    Organised by the Puerto Galera Yacht Club, the All Souls Regatta was first held in 2004 and has quickly become the most popular regatta in the Philippines.  www.pgyc.org

    DECEMBER

    Phuket King’s Cup Regatta

    Now in its 34th year (2020), this regatta attracts up to 100 yachts and 600 sailors for a week of coastal and inshore racing and parties. Raced on Phuket’s west coast and culminating with the Royal Awards Ceremony, it’s the granddaddy of regional regattas.  www.kingscup.com

    Kata Rocks Superyacht Rendezvous

    By invitation only, the Kata Rocks Superyacht Rendezvous (KRSR) is designed to bring like-minded people together from a curated guest list that features yacht owners, major trend-setters, builders, industry professionals and VIP guests interested in yachting and luxury lifestyle, plus an influential mix of luxury lifestyle and yachting media.

    The event is open to both sailing and motor yachts measuring over 24 metres in length, visiting or based in Phuket – Southeast Asia’s leading luxury location and superyacht hot spot. www.katarockssuperyachtrendezvous.com

  • Major repair, haul-out & refit facilities

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    This section gives guidelines for facilities that can cater for yachts 30 metres and above in the Southeast Asian region, taking advantage of the favourable labour costs and locally available skills.

     

    These are in addition to the many boatyards and marina travel-lifts catering for smaller yachts already mentioned in our marina listings and in the destination anchorage texts. We list a few of the major yards we know to have constructed larger vessels and have carried out major refit works on foreign superyachts.

     

    We strongly suggest owners and captains use locally-based project management companies to overcome cultural and language difficulties in each region. But there is a need to carry out careful investigation before appointing one. As with all developing countries, you need to steer clear of ‘here-today-gone-tomorrow businesses’ that put on a good front.

     

    SINGAPORE

    Penguin Shipyard International (PSI)

    Penguin Shipyard International at Tuas caters largely for commercial vessels and mega-yachts up to 500 tons.

    PSI builds and repairs high-speed commercial vessels, including ferries, crewboats, cargo vessels and patrol craft.

    This is an aluminium shipbuilder with a track record that dates back to 1995; the shipyard also arranges international superyacht haulouts.

    PSI operates a 12,000-sqm site with a 500-metric ton straddle carrier, and another 45,000-sqm shipyard on the Indonesian island of Batam, with a 250-metric ton straddle carrier.

    To date, Penguin Shipyard has built more than 50 vessels for the group’s own requirements and for third-party ship owners.

    Facilities include a 50m x 50m covered shipbuilding hall, 6,000 sqm open area and a 50-metre commissioning pier. For more information visit www.penguin.com.sg

    Superyacht refit at  Penguin Shipyard

    Superyacht refit at Penguin Shipyard

    CrestSA Marine & Offshore

    A mile northwest of The Republic of Singapore Yacht Club in the Pandan River is this well-equipped shipyard managed under the Pacific Radiance Group that recently started catering for superyachts.

    Offering repair, maintenance, fabrications, hot works, refit and conversion – alongside or at dry dock – they manage a variety of commercial works.

    Superyachts can access 120 metres of water frontage, two dry docks up to 100 metres and six acres of hard stand. CrestSA Marine & Offshore

    MALAYSIA

    Boustead Langkawi Shipyard

    Formerly Wavemaster Yacht Centre, this yard is situated on the west entrance to Bass Harbour at Bukit Malut. It currently provides full superyacht repair and refit services.

    Alongside the wharf there is a minimum depth of 7 metres at low tide. 140-ton and 500-ton capacity travel lifts service 17,000 sqm of hardstand. Behind the hardstand are two 24-metre high, insulated and ventilated hangers, each of 70 x 25 metres.

    There are adjoining carpentry, aluminium, electrical and mechanical workshops, each with individual overhead gantry cranes. On-site staff naval architects and engineers design for new builds, conversions, and major overhauls.

    Berthing for yachts of 13-70 metres, with fresh water, 3-phase shore power and telecommunications is available off the wharf. Petrol and diesel are also available.

    Lockers, washrooms, showers, chandlery, supermarket and 24-hour security are all within easy walking distance. For more information visit www.blsy.com.my

    Northern Shipyard Langkawi

    A mile northeast of Boustead, in Bass Harbour, is Northern Shipyard. It’s a smaller yard that currently provides full superyacht services.

    It has a 1,000-ton slipway, two hangers (90m and 66m), a 200-ton travel lift, 50 metres of finger pier and two acres of hardstand. It provides full services for superyacht repair, refit and maintenance. www.northernshipyard.com

    THAILAND

    Ratanachai Slipway, Phuket

    Located just inside the entrance of Tha Chin River, Ratanachai Slipway is the biggest of the local shipyards in and around Phuket town.

    Maximum capacity is 52 metres and 210 tons. Bow depth 1.95m, stern depth 3.95m. The river entrance is shallow and should be navigated at high tide only. Full services are available.

    For more information visit www.ratanachai-slipway.com

    Asian Phuket Marine and Dockyard

    Further up the river on the right, just before the bridge, is another Thai-speaking yard with a slipway capable of lifting up to 40 metres with a large concrete hardstand. This is a good location for Phuket-based long-term projects, especially if you’re on a budget and can speak fluent Thai, or have a good translator.

    At the mouth of the river on the same bank there is an alongside concrete wharf where finishing works can be done afloat after launching. www.phuketdockyard.com

    Italthai Marine, Bangkok

    Established in 1978, this 112,000 sqm facility in Samut Prakarn on the Chao Phraya River offers full ship building and repair capabilities plus a bonded warehouse and in-house design office. It has a lifting capacity up to 95m and 3,500 tons, access to two 115m dry docks, 300m alongside and a floating dock up to 160m.

    The facility offers painting in climate-controlled tents, metal fabrication, engineering, carpentry, interiors, survey and full yacht building capabilities. All major classification societies are located in Bangkok. www.italthaimarine.com

    Superyacht refit at Italthai Marine Ltd

    Superyacht refit at Italthai Marine Ltd

    Asian Marine Services Public Co., Ltd. (Surat Thani)

    With head office located at Samut Prakan on the Chao Phraya River, this very capable shipyard has recently opened a smaller yard down in Asimar Surathani on the South China Sea coast. Both Asian Marine Services yards specialise in new ship building, repair, engineering and fabrication for vessels up to 60 tons. www.asimar.com

    INDONESIA

    Surabaya

    The port city of Surabaya in East Java is an ideal location for slipping, sourcing and fabrication. With a mainly Chinese Christian population of five million, Surabaya is the largest naval and shipbuilding city port in Indonesia.

    There are many slipways that cater for vessels over 30 metres and a number of vessels have been built here very economically. These mainly government-supervised yards have produced traditional Pinisis, superyachts and myriad commercial vessels.

    Being the largest naval and marine merchant city of the archipelago, Surabaya boasts an abundance of marine contractors, parts and equipment, but local knowledge is essential to bring any new build or refit projects to fruition. For information visit www.indonesianmarineservices.com

    PHILIPPINES

    Cebu

    Located in Tayud, Consolacion, on the island of Cebu, Colorado Shipyard Corporation (CSC) caters to commercial and private vessels over 30 metres.

    Colorado’s dockyard facility sits on five hectares with three slipways and a transferring system for up to 300 tons. There are plans to build an additional slipway to cater for even larger vessels. All the usual fabrications are available. For more information www.coloradoshipyard.com

    Subic Bay

    Located in the Free-Port Zone in Subic Bay, this in-water refit facility near Lyte Wharf has completed dozens of excellent superyacht refits over the past few years.

    Vessels of up to 90 metres can tie stern-to and access the full variety of work sheds and competent local craftsmen on this 4-acre concrete slab. www.hys-yachts.com

  • Marina facilities in Southeast Asia

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    •  Thailand
    •  Australia
    •  Indonesia
    •  Singapore
    •  Malaysia
    •  Hong Kong
    •  Philippines

    This section lists the Marina Facilities in Southeast Asia, complete with the capacities, amenities and facilities they offer.

    We haven’t listed Greater China’s marinas here yet because they’re all new, much is lost in translation and we need to better understand their capabilities and services for visiting yachts. The China pages will give you a taste of what is available – but no guarantees you’ll find what you read!

    With regard to haul-out, repair, refit and so on, a separate page deals with major facilities, including for superyachts. Here, in the marina listings, we indicate which marinas have similar facilities for smaller yachts.

    THAILAND

    Ao Po Grand Marina (Phuket)

    Berths: 220 | VHF: Ch69 | Haul out ramp: 47 & 90 tons trailer lifts | Repair-refit facilities & services: Limited |Chandlery: Yes | Superyachts: Yes | Hardstand: 66 | Fuel: Yes | F&B: 3

    Krabi Boat Lagoon Marina

    Berths: 80 | VHF: Ch67 | Haul out: Travel lift 50 tons, ramp, forklift | Hardstand: 100 | Repair-refit facilities & services: Limited | Chandlery: No | Superyachts: No | Fuel: Yes | F&B: 1

    Ocean Marina – Pattaya

    Berths: 380 | VHF: Ch12 | Haul out: Travel lift 75 & 20 tons; 5-ton fork lift; trailer boat ramp & tractor | Hardstand: 40 | Drystack: Yes | Repair-refit facilities & services: Yes | Chandlery: Yes | Superyachts: Yes | Fuel: Yes | F&B: 2
    www.oceanmarinayachtclub.com

    Phuket Boat Lagoon

    Berths: 180 | VHF: Ch71 | Haul out: 3 x Travel lifts 40, 50, 80 tons | Repair-refit facilities & services: Yes | Chandlery: Yes | Superyachts: No | Drystack: 50 | Hardstand: 134 |Ramp: 7-ton forklift | Fuel: Yes | F&B: >10
    www.phuketboatlagoon.com

    Phuket Yacht Haven

    Berths: 320 | VHF: Ch68 | Haul out: No | Repair-refit facilities & services: Yes – at berth only | Chandlery: Yes | Superyachts: Yes | Fuel: Yes | F&B: 3

    Port Takola Yacht Marina & Boatyard Krabi

    Berths: 50 – Phase 1 | VHF: Ch69 | Haul out ramp: 38 tons forklift | Hardstand: 40 | Repair-refit facilities & services: No | Chandlery: No | Superyachts: Yes <40m | Fuel: Yes | F&B: 1
    www.porttakola.com

    Port Takola Yacht Marina
    Port Takola Yacht Marina
    Racer Marina, Hua Hin 

    Berths: 100 | VHF: Ch79 Haul out: Travel lift 65 tons | Repair-refit facilities & services: Yes | Chandlery: No | Superyachts: No | Hardstand: 100 | Fuel: Yes | F&B: 1

    Royal Phuket Marina

    Berths: 76 | VHF: Ch79 Haul out: Travel lift 50 tons | Repair-refit facilities & services: Limited | Chandlery: No | Superyachts: Yes <35m | Hardstand: 45 | Fuel: Yes | F&B: 1 only; subject to change

    Siam Royal View

    Berths: 75 | VHF: Ch16 | Haul out: No | Superyachts: No | Repair-refit facilities & services: No | Chandlery: No |Fuel: No | F&B: 2

     

    AUSTRALIA

    Bayview Marina, Darwin

    Berths: 128 | VHF: Ch68 | Haul out: No | Repair-refit facilities & services: No | Chandlery: No | Superyachts: No | Fuel: No | F&B: 2

    Darwin-Cullen Bay Marina

    Berths: 140 | VHF: Ch11 | Haul out: No | Repair-refit facilities & services: No | Chandlery: No | Superyachts: No | Fuel: Yes (outside lock) | F&B: 2

    Tipperary Waters Marina

    Berths: 72| VHF: Ch8 | Haul out: No | Repair-refit facilities & services: No | Chandlery: No | Superyachts: No | Fuel: No | F&B: 2

    Cairns Marlin Marina 

    Berths: 266 | VHF: Ch16&81 | Haul out: No | Repair-refit facilities & services: No | Chandlery: Yes | Superyachts: Yes | Fuel: Yes | F&B: Several

    Half Moon Bay at Yorkeys Knob (Cairns)

    Berths: 197 | VHF: Ch16 | Haul out: No | Repair-refit facilities & services: Limited | Chandlery: Yes | Superyachts: No | Fuel: Yes | F&B: 2

    Crystalbrook Superyacht Marina Port Douglas

    Berths: 135 | VHF: Ch16 | Haul out: No | Repair-refit facilities & services: Limited | Chandlery: Yes | Superyachts: Yes | Fuel: Yes | F&B: 2

     

    INDONESIA

    Ancol Marina Jakarta

    Berths: 12 | VHF: Ch16 | Haul out: No | Repair-refit facilities & services: No | Chandlery: No | Superyachts: No | Fuel: No | F&B: 2

    Bali Marina Benoa

    Berths: 30 | VHF: Ch77 | Haul out: No | Chandlery: No | Superyachts: Yes | Fuel: No | F&B: 2 | CIQ

    Batavia Marina Jakarta

    Berths: 28 | VHF: Ch16 | Haul out: No | Chandlery: No | Repair-refit facilities & services: No | Superyachts: 2 | Fuel: No | F&B: 2

    Marina Del Ray Lombok

    Berths: 6 Moorings | VHF: Ch16 | Haul out: No | Repair-refit facilities & services: No | Chandlery: No | Superyachts: No | F&B: 2

    Medana Bay Marina

    Berths: 10 | VHF: Ch77 | Haul out: No | Repair-refit facilities & services: No | Chandlery: No | Superyachts: No | Fuel: No | F&B: 2

    Nongsa Point Marina

    Berths: 178 | VHF: Ch69 | Haul out: No | Repair-refit facilities & services: No | Chandlery: No | Superyachts: Yes | Fuel: No | F&B: 1 | CIQ

    Pantai Mutiara Marina Jakarta (silted entrance at writing)

    Berths: 12 | VHF: Ch16 | Haul out: No | Repair-refit facilities & services: No | Chandlery: No | Superyachts: No

     

    SINGAPORE

    ONE°15 Marina Club

    Berths: 270 | VHF: Ch77 | Haul out: No | Drystack: 40 | Repair-refit facilities & services: Yes | Chandlery: Yes | Superyachts: Yes | Fuel: Yes | F&B: 4

    ONE°15 Marina Club, Sentosa
    ONE°15 Marina Club

    Marina Country Club

    Berths: 35 | VHF: Ch77 | Haul out: Travel lift 60 tons | Ramp: 10- & 12‑ton forklifts | Drystack: 50 | Hardstand: 200 | Repair-refit facilities & services: Yes | Chandlery: No | Superyachts: No | Fuel: No | F&B: 2

    Marina at Keppel Bay

    Berths: 168 | VHF: Ch77 | Haul out: No | Repair-refit facilities & services: No | Chandlery: No | Superyachts: Yes | Fuel: Yes | F&B: 4

    Raffles Marina

    Berths: 152 | VHF: Ch77 | Haul out: Travel lift 70 tons | Drystack: 40 | Repair-refit facilities & services: Yes | Chandlery: No | Superyachts: Yes | Fuel: Yes | F&B: 3

    Republic of Singapore Yacht Club

    Berths: 127 | VHF: Ch77 | Haul out: Travel lift | Hardstand: 218 | Repair-refit facilities & services: Yes | Chandlery: No | Superyachts: Yes | Fuel: Yes | F&B: 2

     

    MALAYSIA

    Admiral Marina

    Berths: 130 | VHF: Ch14 | Haul out: No | Repair-refit facilities & services: No | Chandlery: No | Superyachts: 4 | Fuel: Yes | F&B: 2 | CIQ: Close by

    Batu Uban Marina Penang

    Berths: 20 | VHF: Ch71 | Haul out: No | Repair-refit facilities & services: No | Chandlery: No | Superyachts: No | Fuel: No | F&B: 2

    Kuching Marina

    Berths: 20 | VHF: No | Haul out: No | Repair-refit facilities & services: No | Chandlery: No | Superyachts: No | Fuel: No | F&B: No | CIQ | Yes

    Labuan Public Marina

    Berths: 37 | VHF: No | Haul out: No | Repair-refit facilities & services: No | Chandlery: No | Superyachts: No| Fuel: No | F&B: 1 | CIQ | Yes

    Lumut International Yacht Club

    Berths: 40 | VHF: Ch72 | Haul out: No | Repair-refit facilities & services: No | Chandlery: No | Superyachts: No | Fuel: No | F&B: 2

    Malacca Marina

    Berths: 24 | VHF: Ch16 | Haul out: No | Repair-refit facilities & services: No | Chandlery: No | Superyachts: No | Fuel: No | F&B:  No | CIQ: Close by

    Marina Island Pangkor

    Berths: 60 | VHF: Ch69 | Haul out: SEAlift, forklift, crane | Hardstand: 12 | Repair-refit facilities & services: Yes | Chandlery: Yes | Superyachts: 2 | Fuel: No | F&B: 6

    Miri Marina

    Berths: 80 | VHF: Ch69 | Haul out: No | Repair-refit facilities & services: No | Chandlery: No | Superyachts: No | Fuel: No | F&B: 1

    Pulau Indah – Entrance to Port Klang

    Berths: 80 | VHF: Ch16 | Haul out: No | Repair-refit facilities & services: No | Chandlery: No | Superyachts: No | Fuel: No | F&B: 2

    Pulau Tioman Marina

    Berths: 24 | VHF: No | Haul out: No | Repair-refit facilities & services: No | Chandlery: No | Superyachts: No | Fuel: No | F&B: No | CIQ

    Puteri Harbour in Johor Bahru

    Berths: 76 | VHF: Ch18 | Haul out: No | Repair-refit facilities & services: No | Chandlery: No | Superyachts: 12 | Fuel: No | F&B: 12 | CIQ | Yes

    Rebak Marina

    Berths: 124 | VHF: Ch69 | Haul out: Travel lift 65 tons | Hardstand: 70 | Repair-refit facilities & services: Limited | Chandlery: No | Superyachts: No | Fuel: Yes | F&B: 2

    Royal Langkawi Yacht Club

    Berths: 200 | VHF: Ch69 | Haul out: No | Repair-refit facilities & services: No | Chandlery: No | Superyachts: 4 | Fuel: Yes | F&B: 2 | CIQ: Close by

    Royal Selangor Yacht Club Marina

    Berths: 30 | VHF: Ch72 | Haul out: Ramp & Crane | Hardstand: 12 | Repair-refit facilities & services: Limited | Chandlery: No | Superyachts: 2 | Fuel: No | F&B: 1 | CIQ: Close by

    Sebana Cove Johor Bahru

    Berths: 125 | VHF: Ch71 | Haul out: No | Repair-refit facilities & services: No | Chandlery: No | Superyachts: No | Fuel: No | F&B: 1 | CIQ: Close by

    Senibong Cove Marina East Johor Bahru

    Berths: 100 | VHF: Ch71 | Haul out: No | Repair-refit facilities & services: No | Chandlery: No | Superyachts: No | Fuel: No | F&B: 1

    Straits Quay Marina

    Berths: 40 | VHF: Ch71 | Haul out: No | Repair-refit facilities & services: No | Chandlery: No | Superyachts: No | Fuel: No | F&B: 6

    Sutera Harbour

    Berths: 104 | VHF: Ch71 | Haul out: No | Repair-refit facilities & services: No | Chandlery: No | Superyachts: Yes | Fuel: No | F&B: 1

    Tanjung Belungkor Ferry Terminal Marina Johor Bahru

    Berths: 6 / VHF: Ch16 / Haul out: No / Repair-refit facilities & services: No / Chandlery: No / Superyachts: No / Fuel: No / F&B: No / CIQ / Yes

    Tanjung Pengelih Johor Bahru

    Berths: 30 | VHF: Ch16 | Haul out: No | Repair-refit facilities & services: No | Chandlery: No | Superyachts: No | Fuel: No | F&B: No | CIQ | Yes

    Telaga Harbour

    Berths: 67 | VHF: Ch69 | Haul out: No | Repair-refit facilities & services: No | Chandlery: No | Superyachts: 10 | Fuel: Yes | F&B: 8 | CIQ | Yes

     

    HONG KONG

    Aberdeen Marina Club

    Berths: 170 | Haul out: Fork lift | Drystack: 157 | Repair-refit facilities & services: Limited | Chandlery: No | Superyachts: No | Fuel: Yes | F&B: 2

    Gold Coast Yacht and Country Club

    Berths: 200 | Haul out: No | Repair-refit facilities & services: No | Chandlery: No | Fuel: No | Superyachts: Yes | F&B: 2

    Hebe Haven Yacht Club

    Berths: 53 | Haul out: Ramp and Trailers <7 tons <10 tons | Repair-refit facilities & services: Limited | Chandlery: No | Superyachts: No | Fuel: No | F&B: 2

    Hong Kong Marina

    Berths: 250 | Haul out: Ramp and Trailer | Repair-refit facilities & services: No | Chandlery: No | Superyachts: Yes | Fuel: Yes | F&B: 2

    Marina Club Discovery Bay / Lantau Yacht Club

    Marina Club Discovery Bay closed at the end of 2018. It is scheduled to re-open in 2020 as the remodelled Lantau Yacht Club, with 150 berths ranging from 10 to 60 metres, according to their website.

    PHILIPPINES

    Manila Yacht Club

    Berths: 60 | VHF: Ch16 | Haul out: Travel lift 40 tons | Repair-refit facilities & services: Yes | Chandlery: No | Superyachts: Yes | Fuel: No | F&B: 2

    Subic Bay Yacht Club

    Berths: 150 | VHF: Ch16 | Haul out: Travel lift 60 tons | Repair-refit facilities & services: Yes | Chandlery: No | Superyachts: Yes | Fuel: Yes | F&B: 4

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While every effort has been made to ensure that the information contained in this book is accurate, the charts of anchorages are based on personal experience and satellite imagery and are intended as a guide only. They should not be used for navigation. Please refer to Official Hydrographic Charts of the respective countries.

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The copyright holders of all content, in print and digital editions, are: Published book © Phuket Publicity Services Ltd. Part. / Texts © Bill O’Leary, Andy Dowden & Grenville Fordham / Design, layout & charts © Grenville Fordham / Photography: © as indicated in photo credits. All rights reserved
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